Errors and corrections, CBS News

Sumner Redstone published, “The magazine marked the September 11, 2011 terror attacks with Art Spiegelman’s vivid black-on-black portrait of the Twin Towers… Credit: The New Yorker”

The attacks occured in 2001, not 2011.

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@pagea2.com]
Sent: Monday, April 30, 2012 9:28 AM
To: Sumner Redstone, CBS, National Amusements (via Rachel Lulay)
Cc: Rand Morrison, executive producer, CBS News Sunday Morning, National Amusements; David Rhodes, president, CBS News, national Amusements (via S. McNair)
Subject: correction, 9/11, CBS News Sunday Morning, National Amusements

This is an experiment to determine how few characters it takes to elicit a correction and how long it takes for that change to occur.


Greg Fisher
Page A2
pagea2.com
PO Box 342
Dayton, Ohio  45409-0342

Source changed his story

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@pagea2.com]
Sent: Friday, April 27, 2012 10:55 AM
To: Thomas S. Monson, president, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (via L. Kirkland); Henry B. Eyring, first counselor, First Presidency, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; Dieter F. Uchtdorf, second counselor, First Presidency, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; Christopher M. Lee, EVP and publisher, DeseretNews.com, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; Chris Higbee, general manager, DeseretNews.com, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints ; Rick Hall, managing editor, Deseret News, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; Lois M. Collins, reporter and columnist, Deseret News, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; Clark Gilbert, president and CEO, Deseret News Publishing Company and Deseret Digital Media, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; Mary McConnell, member, Editorial Advisory Board, Deseret News, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Cc: Blaze Bullock, business reporter, Deseret News, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Subject: RE: credit score, employers, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints II

Please correct your stories.

Employers do not use credit scores (click on “Bad credit doesn’t impact candidates getting hired”).

News Corporation changed its sentence referring to the Society for Human Resource Management (replacing the word scores with reports), leaving you twisting in the wind.


Greg Fisher
Page A2
pagea2.com
PO Box 342
Dayton, Ohio  45409-0342


From: NewsMedia
Sent: Wednesday, April 25, 2012 5:46 PM
To: Greg Fisher
Subject: Automatic reply: credit score, employers, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Thank you for your email. News media requests received through this contact form are forwarded to media relations staff. Please be aware that the contact information provided on MormonNewsroom.org is for news media only. We are unable to address or respond to other inquiries through this site.

To provide general feedback, please use this link or go to MormonNewsroom.org and click on “Feedback.”

[previous message]

What does it take to get a media correction or clarification?

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@pagea2.com]
Sent: Wednesday, April 25, 2012 5:46 PM
To: Thomas S. Monson, president, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (via L. Kirkland)
Cc: Blaze Bullock, business reporter, Deseret News, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Subject: credit score, employers, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

This is an experiment to determine how few characters it takes to elicit a correction or clarification and how long it takes for the change to occur.


Greg Fisher
Page A2
pagea2.com
PO Box 342
Dayton, Ohio  45409-0342

Chicago Tribune, errors and corrections

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@pagea2.com]
Sent: Friday, April 20, 2012 11:11 AM
To: Sam Zell, Tribune Company; Gerould W. Kern, editor, Chicago Tribune; Jane Hirt, managing editor, Chicago Tribune; Mary Elson, managing editor, Tribune Media Services
Cc: Mortimer B. Zuckerman, chairman, Executive Committee, editor-in-chief, U.S. News & World Report (via Liz Putze); Daniel Bortz, reporter/editor, Personal Finance, U.S. News & World Report
Subject: RE: credit score, employers, U.S. News, Chicago Tribune

See this message and your response at http://www.pagea2.com/chicago-tribune-errors-and-corrections/.

You published a U.S. News & World Report item that states, “Even job applicants can have their credit scores pulled by employers, as a means of determining if they’ll be a risky hire for the company.”

On the contrary, your website also states: “Similar to the reports that a consumer can obtain for free each year through credit-reporting agencies, employers receive a report that lists debt. The reports do not, however, give an applicant’s credit score.”


Greg Fisher
Page A2
pagea2.com
PO Box 342
Dayton, Ohio  45409-0342

U.S. News & World Report, errors and corrections

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@pagea2.com]
Sent: Monday, April 16, 2012 4:40 PM
To: Mortimer B. Zuckerman, chairman, Executive Committee, editor-in-chief, U.S. News & World Report (via Liz Putze)
Cc: Daniel Bortz, reporter/editor, Personal Finance, U.S. News & World Report
Subject: credit score, employers, U.S. News

See this message and your response at http://www.pagea2.com/u-s-news-world-report-errors-and-corrections/.

You published, “Even job applicants can have their credit scores pulled by employers, as a means of determining if they’ll be a risky hire for the company.”

That page contains advertisements while dispensing false information.

On the other hand, you also published: “Employers can buy a ‘consumer report’ from a credit reporting agency. The report doesn’t include your credit score, but does include a lot of information you wouldn’t expect: your driving and criminal records, as well as interviews with your family, friends, neighbors and known associates.”

And, you even published this statement you attribute to a consumer reporting agency: “To clarify, TransUnion does not provide a credit score for employment screening purposes.”

Ironically, even is a word often associated with reports of employers using credit scores.

Who is your source?


Greg Fisher
Page A2
pagea2.com
PO Box 342
Dayton, Ohio  45409-0342

 

Consumers Union, Microsoft, viral myth and error

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@pagea2.com]
Sent: Thursday, April 05, 2012 11:35 AM
To: Stacy Johnson, CPA, executive producer, publisher, president, journalist, Money Talks News
Cc: Walter D. Bristol, chairman, Consumer Reports, Consumers Union; Amanda Walker, Consumer Reports senior project editor, Consumers Union; Margaret Shader, Web associate editor, Consumer Reports, Consumers Union; Communications, Consumers Union; James A. Guest, president, CEO, consumer Reports, Consumers Union; K. James Yager, CEO, director, Barrington Broadcasting Group, LLC; Miranda Marquit, staff writer, Moolanomy; Miranda Marquit, personal finance advice blogger, Family Money, Equifax; Amey Stone, deputy managing editor, MSN Money, Microsoft; Richard Jenkins, MSN Money, Microsoft; MSN Money editors, Microsoft; Christopher Oster, managing editor, MSN Money, Microsoft
Subject: RE: whistle stop, Consumers Union, Barrington Broadcasting, Money Talks News, MSN Money, viral

See this message and your response at http://www.pagea2.com/tag/microsoft/.

You appear to be part of a chain of sources for a myth and error gone viral.

Your video—to which a Barrington Broadcasting story appears to refer—now appears on Microsoft’s MSN Money.  The MSN article that surrounds it, “Why non-FICO credit scores aren’t worth buying” (elsewhere titled, “Don’t Buy Non-FICO Credit Scores”) is written by a blogger who actually works with Equifax, one of only two companies who sell the FICO credit score to consumers.

In the video (in which you mention Consumers Union), you state, “Your credit score is obviously important if you’re borrowing money, but many employers also look at scores when hiring.”

Employers do not use credit scores.

At the moment, your piece (titled “Time for free credit scores”) is the featured video on the MSN Money page, “Video tips: Credit scores, credit reports – MSN Money.”  The page says:

The world of credit has seen dramatic changes recently. While interest rates are low, lending standards are higher. Having a high credit rating is more important than ever, yet many people are buried in debt and hobbled by bad credit.

Good thing you’ve found MSN Money’s archive of videos about credit scores. How often should you request your credit reports and monitor your credit scores? How can you raise your credit scores? What are FICO scores?

Your video also appears (with advertisements) on your website, Money Talks News.  On the page containing the video, you exaggerate: “It’s no exaggeration to say your credit score can change your life. This single number can determine whether you get a job or own a home.”

Who told you that?


Greg Fisher
Page A2
pagea2.com
PO Box 342
Dayton, Ohio  45409-0342

 

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@creditscoring.com]
Sent: Friday, March 23, 2012 2:34 PM
To: K. James Yager, CEO, director, Barrington Broadcasting Group, LLC
Cc: Walter D. Bristol, chairman, Consumer Reports, Consumers Union; Amanda Walker, Consumer Reports senior project editor, Consumers Union; Communications, Consumers Union; James A. Guest, president, CEO, consumer Reports, Consumers Union
Subject: Whistle-Stop, Consumers Union, Barrington Broadcasting, Who told you that?

With incredulity, you published: “Your credit score is obviously important if you’re borrowing money. But many employers also look at scores when hiring.”

At the bottom of that story is a link to the “Consumers Union website,” however, the Consumers Union page at the link address does not support your statement; it does not mention employers.

On a whistle-stop tour this month, I visited Consumer Reports.  The person with that organization I spoke to there wrote:

Sent: Thursday, March 08, 2012 1:34 PM
To: greg@creditscoring.com
Subject: Follow up to your visit earlier today

Hello Greg,

After your visit, I conferred with Mandy Walker and our experts over at Consumers Union (the advocacy arm of Consumer Reports), and we’ve since updated Mandy’s quote in my blog to more accurately reflect the updated language now found at the website cited.

I just wanted to thank you for bringing this to my attention, and apologize for the communication disconnect that occurred on this end between Consumers Union and Consumer Reports, which meant the update was not made to the blog post sooner.

Again, thanks for your sharp eye and follow through,
[name]

(Despite that, still, another Consumers Union document states, inaccurately, “Without a Disaster Information Shield, FICO scoring models could pose an affirmative barrier to the efforts of disaster victims to regain, and maintain, financial stability, access reasonably priced credit, and even regain employment.”)

Your page even contains advertisements while misinforming readers by saying that employers use credit scores.

Who told you that?


Greg Fisher
The Credit Scoring Site
creditscoring.com
PO Box 342
Dayton, Ohio  45409-0342

 

Tulsa World, Samsung Galaxy Note screen size

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@pagea2.com]
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2012 10:00 AM
To: Robert E. Lorton, chairman, World Publishing Co. (via S. Ellerbach)
Subject: Tulsa World, Samsung Galaxy Note screen size

See this message and your response at http://www.pagea2.com/tag/tulsa-world/.

You published: “Let’s go ahead and get this out of our systems – the Samsung Galaxy Note is gigantic… [w]ith a 5.1-inch screen, it’s bigger than any smartphone I’ve ever seen.”

The manufacturer states that the screen size of the device is 5.3 inches, not 5.1.

How did you determine the screen size?

Where are your corrections?


Greg Fisher
Page A2
pagea2.com
PO Box 342
Dayton, Ohio  45409-0342